Festival of Colors in South India

Festival of Colors in South India

The festival of colors Holi in south India is not different from other parts of North India but it only differs in its way of celebration. In south the festival of colors Holi begins with lighting up of bonfire on the occasion of Holi. The festival of colors Holi is one of the major festival of India and is the most vibrant of all festivals which is celebrated with great joy in every part of south and Northern India.

People apply ‘gulal’ and ‘abeer’ on each others’ faces and cheer up saying, “bura na maano Holi hai”.  The festival of colors Holi is celebrated during the arrival of spring season of joy and hope.

Originally the festival of colors Holi was regarded to be the festival to celebrate good harvests and fertility of the land. There are several legends and stories behind the festival of Holi are as follows:

festivals of colour

Stories of Festival of colors Holi:

The festival of colors Holi is one of the oldest festivals of India as it is associated with many interesting stories of ‘Holika Dahan’ and Legend of Radha-Krishan.

Holika Dhahan is the lighting of bonfires which symbolizes the The victory of good over evil. Tthe legend of demon king Hiranyakashyap sister Holika was burnt in the fire when king Hiranyakashyap wished to end his blessed son, Prahlad’s life with the help of his her, and nothing happened to Prahlad instead evil is burnt. Since then the day is celebrated in victory of good over evil.

Another legend of Radha and Krishna is very much related with this festival of colors Holi. It is believed that when Lord Krishna was young and had a dark complexion felt jealous of his beloved Radha’s extremely fair skin. So in a mischievous mood, krishna applied color on Radha’s face. So with this incident the festival of colors Holi is celebrated by every one as an expression of love.

The festival of colors Holi also gives a great occasion to send blessings to their ones in the form of a special Holi gift.

Festival of Colors in Andhra Pradesh:

Once the festival of colors Holi in south India are not celebrated as grand as in North India. But today people of Andhra Pradesh celebrate the festival of colors Holi with great joy which falls in the month of Phalguna on the full moon day in March according to the English calendar.

People of Andhra Pradesh participate in the festival of colors Holi by playing with dry colors in the evening by youngsters and seek the blessings by putting gulal and abeer on the feet of the elders.

Especially the Banjara tribes of Andhra Pradesh celebrate Holi in their own way by performing graceful dances by the colourful Banjara people.

Festival of Colors in Tamilnadu:

In the state of Tamilnadu people celebrate the festival of colors Holi which is related to the legend of Kama Deva. The Holi festival is also named in three different names as Kaman Pandigai, Kamavilas and Kama-Dahanam.

On the day of Holi festival songs are sung that tell the dismal tale of Rati and her lamentations.  The story related to the festival of colors Holi is that of Kamadeva-the Love God, who moves through the woods in the season of Spring, aiming his passion tipped arrows that pierce the heart at all who cross his path, from his bow made of sweet sugarcane strung with humming bees.

Festival of colors in Maharashtra:

The festival of colors Holi in Maharashtra has its own grand style of celebration. Holi festival is called Shimga or Rangpanchamiin Maharastra. The young people of Maharashtra celebrate this festival of Colors Holi with great excitement. They break a pot of butter milk hung high on the street forming a huge pyramids by a trained groups called tolis. And the womenfolk flow of colour water on the men when they try to break the pot.

The festival of colors is very much popular amongst the fisher folk im Maharastra. They celebrate the Holi festival by singing, dancing and merry-making which provides them the means to release all their self-conscious feelings, needs and desires. They make sounds through their mouths in a peculiar fashion by striking their mouths with the back of their hands.